Sierra Quests on the Mobiles Link

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    • #29309
      Unknown,Unknown
      Participant

      Dear Ken,

      I think the link to Sierra Quests on the Mobiles project could be interesting for SierraGamers audience.

      Thanks in advance,
      Oleg

      Sierra Quests on the Mobiles

    • #29310
      Unknown,Unknown
      Participant

      (Re: Sierra Quests on the Mobiles Link)

      Dear Oleg,

      I totally disagree. First off, mobile phones were designed, originally, to
      be phones. To create Sierra games on the phones would require the following:
      (1) Very long battery life, (2) Dedicated user that have plenty of HOURS to
      waste, (3) A 70’s child mentality.

      Personally, I hate cell/mobile phones. They cause more problems then
      anything else. The technology is still very “static” (pun intended.) They
      divert ones attention from the duties at hand. They are now transformed from
      ways to communicate to ways of entertainment. ‘Playing’ with your phone
      could cost you your job. Driving with your phone could cost your life.
      Relying on your cell phone to work in all locations is fantasy, (sales
      pitch.) The technology is still new. I feel the games on phones are ‘more
      buttons to push’. A large selling point for cellphone companies.

      I will only buy a cellphone when these criterias are reached:
      – Cellphone reception is as clear as a rotary pulse telephone.
      – Cellphone can be heard by every tower no matter where you’re at.
      – Cellphone charges come under the price of owning a home telephone line.
      – Cellphone companies take out all the stupid ‘bells and whistles’ that
      you are billed extra for.

      Sierra games should only be computer games.

    • #29311
      Unknown,Unknown
      Participant

      (re: Sierra Quests on the Mobiles Link) Dear Richard,

      Our intent is to continue the life of the great products on the new platform. We consider the phone as a small computer which is always with you, nothing more (to play classic Sierra games the reception on the phone can be switched off).

      We target Series 60 smartphones including Nokia N-Gage, N-gage QD, 7650, 3650, 3660, 6610… Siemens SX1 and others.

      Space Quest II on the Phone

    • #29312
      Unknown,Unknown
      Participant

      (re: Sierra Quests on the Mobiles Link)

      I have to admit it’s pretty interesting. It’s just like the project for Sierra AGI games on Gameboy Advance, in a way. I bought a GBASP mostly so I could try that out. Anyway, didn’t I hear somewhere that Sierra is actually interested in marketing games to cell phones? While, on the other hand, ultimately they weren’t interested in the GBA stuff. Anyway, I will make a link in the link listing to your website.

    • #29313
      Unknown,Unknown
      Participant

      (re: Sierra Quests on the Mobiles Link) Thanks, Brandon!
      We were contacting Sierra/VUG trying to sell them this idea. We were ready to get all the work including the development, repainting the UI and making control improvements (for example to switch from the text commands to more “point’n’click” or “get closer’n’do” type of the interface). Unfortunately they were not interested.

    • #29314
      Unknown,Unknown
      Participant

      >I will only buy a cellphone when these criterias are reached:
      >- Cellphone reception is as clear as a rotary pulse telephone.
      >- Cellphone can be heard by every tower no matter where you’re at.
      >- Cellphone charges come under the price of owning a home telephone line.
      >- Cellphone companies take out all the stupid ‘bells and whistles’ that you are billed extra for.

      Well, here in Finland all those criterias are already met with. It’s even feared that normal phone lines will become useless here since it’s much more cheaper to get a cellphone. For example my monthly phone bill is about 19 euros (’bout 25 dollars), the same thing with normal phone line was about 36 euros (47 dollars) per month.

      The sound is much more clearer than your normal pulse phone and you can talk pretty much everywhere you want, unless you’re way underground.

    • #29315
      Unknown,Unknown
      Participant

      In the UK, mobile cellular phones are the standard form of communication, preferred over landline telephone services for reasons of price and convenience. As such, video games for mobile phones are commonplace, and phones have been evolving toward a PDA type of package (e.g., widespread vidphone capability). Furthermore, as laptops, notebooks, and Tablets evolve, we see the merging of these two industries. This is already the case with the XDA and a similar project by Sony that merges a PDA — and full video and sound support — with completely wireless communication technology and Internet, resulting in handheld computer-vidphones reminiscent of Star Trek or Gene Roddenberry’s Earth: Final Conflict. Even standard phones now, at least in the UK, have the ability to download games so there is no need to remain connected to any wireless service.

      We already know of the success of mindless arcade, card, board, and memory games on mobile phones and PDAs. These are especially popular among the commuters, who make up the vast majority of the city populations (particularly London) in the UK. The same can be said of other major cities, like New York, Paris, Tokyo. There is also the large long-distance commuter market, such as those who fly on a regular basis. As aforementioned, the technology already exists for all these people to enjoy these games at low cost, and that industry is rising.

      Can adventure games become a viable source of entertainment on mobile phones and PDAs? I think the answer to this depends on the type of adventure games, specifically their length and interface. The average daily city commute is most likely less than two hours, and, since that market greatly outnumbers the long-distance commuter market, I will only consider them in my analysis. Based on an average gaming session of, say, an hour, is it possible to provide the commuter with something entertaining enough to be fulfilling and yet leave them with the desire to continue it the next day? The current games provide a quick break in monotony and do not require any investment of time or energy, while adventure games require patience and dedication (hence the savegame function). A major factor that distinguishes an adventure game from any other type of aforementioned game is its length and, by inference, replayability: all other aforementioned games have infinite (or infinitely looping) length allowing for limitless replayability, while an adventure game has a set storyline that, once completed, limits replayability due to the lack of surprises. The other types of games do not build such expectations and so can be replayed with greater entertainment than adventure games. Conversely, a storyline’s entertainment value decreases with length, so if we were to create an hour-long adventure, it would not be as enjoyable as a 12-hour one.

      Likewise, the conventional adventure game interface is not conducive to short gaming sessions. The point-and-click interface can be frustrating unless pixel-hunting — arguably a major component of adventure gaming — is eliminated, and, even then, the interface does not cater to bumpy rides (e.g., those commuting by car, bus, or train). A text interface is even more frustrating, requiring too much time and effort to input a single command.

      With that said, is it possible to provide a meaningful storyline that can be played in an hour? Not by current (or past, meaning Sierra) standards. Any “port” of past games to this medium would be popular only among the die-hard fans, which is too small an audience to net any profit. (In fact, the cost to make, package, and advertise it would probably be significantly more than any expected returns.) So, old games are out, but there is still the possibility of creating entirely new games for this medium. It is definitely possible to create a game that randomly generates a new adventure — designed to be completed within an hour — each session, perhaps with the added bonus of a savegame or two, akin to LucasArts’ Desktop Adventures (but substituting storyline and adventure-style puzzles for arcade and maze elements). A further help would be to remove the need for savegames, making dying completely impossible (i.e., like Leisure Suit Larry 7, and LucasArts’ Monkey Island series).

      But even in this case, it still caters to a limited audience that prefers puzzle-solving amidst storyline backdrop, and this also assumes that such an audience would enjoy playing their favourite type of game — usually requiring the amount of patience and dedication that can be found in the comforts of their own home — while on the move during a hectic business day. Thus, the audience for this type of game would probably be a small minority of the already small adventure game audience. In short, exporting past adventure games to mobile phones and PDAs is a wasted business venture, but it is, as you have proven, still a viable fan effort, albeit for very few fans. Creating new adventure games designed for short timespans, on the other hand, is definitely a potentially profitable venture, but only if the mainstream adventure game industry (i.e., for PCs) is revived.

      In conclusion, it’s no surprise that Vivendi rejected your proposal at the present time. If adventure games ever re-emerged as a leading contender in the game industry, however, your idea — if modified in the aforementioned ways — could succeed.

      –Matt

    • #29316
      Tom,Lee
      Participant

      Welcome to 2009!

      We now have the very excellent ScummVM on most symbian mobiles.  Playing the likes of Monkey Island 2 on my touch screen Nokia 5800 is a dream!  Great for long commutes etc.  I only wish we had something like ScummVM for the later sierra releases like SQ IV etc.  Any ideas?

      P.S Whoever posted the first response that said “I totally disagree. First off, mobile phones were designed, originally, to
      be phones. To create Sierra games on the phones would require the following:
      (1) Very long battery life, (2) Dedicated user that have plenty of HOURS to
      waste, (3) A 70’s child mentality.”

      YOU WERE SO WRONG! GET WITH THE TIMES GRANDAD!

    • #29317
      Collector,
      Participant

      First, ScummVM has included Gluten in its developmental build:

      http://forums.scummvm.org/viewtopic.php?t=7206

      Second, all of the SCI DOS games run fine in DOSBox and there are DOSBox ports for some mobiles and third, there is no reason to be insultive. No name calling, please.

    • #29318
      Tom,Lee
      Participant

      Thank you for your help! I’ll try the developmental build on my phone.  Unfortunately dosbox isn’t yet supported by my handset 🙁 But hopefully they’ll bring it out soon.

      Apologies if I came across insulting.  I only meant it in a light hearted way.  I felt that I should support the original poster of this thread (Oleg) as I think the whole “adventure game in you pocket” idea is brilliant.  People all over the world on long train journeys, coach rides etc could enjoy adventure games.  I meant no malice in what I said so once again apologies and I will try to refrain from name calling in the future unless totally necessary. 🙂

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