Sellar 7 / Nova 9

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    • #29426 Reply
      Unknown,Unknown
      Participant

      These two games were the most addictive games I had ever played. They had a small story line but lots of action. In a 3D world, objects would appear and you would have to kill or be killed. The bad guys ranged from tanks that turned invisible to bombs that made a B-line for your ship.

      My questions are: Is there any way to get these games? and What was Sierra’s connection with Dynamix? Did Sierra buy Dynamix, create Dynamix, or become partners with Dynamix?

    • #29427 Reply
      Unknown,Unknown
      Participant

      something between the 1st and the 3rd πŸ™‚

      Dynamix AFAIK was always a ‘secondary’ company… all its productions i know of, were collaboration with other companies.. i also knew it through Sierra, and i was surprised when i found out some really old games by Dynamix

    • #29428 Reply
      Unknown,Unknown
      Participant

      Dynamix was Sierra’s first acquisition. We bought them sometime in the early to mid eighties.

      Dynamix was best known for their 3d simulators. In those days, there was no hardware 3d, so very few companies were producing any kind of 3d product. Dynamix had a huge hit with a product called Red Baron, and followed it with Aces over Europe.

      Towards the end (1996) they had expanded into a wide range of categories, including pinball (3D Pinball), adventure games (Willie Beamish, Rama) and even fishing (Bass Fishing).

      There were times when Dynamix could have used more cost controls (late delivery, budget overruns) but they consistently developed some of Sierra’s best products, and were extremely respected in the organization for their creativity and technical genious.

      My belief is that they were shut down completely within a couple of years after Sierra was acquired. When I ran the company they had approximately 100 employees,

      -Ken W

    • #29429 Reply
      Unknown,Unknown
      Participant

      Quote:
      “… (by Ken Williams) Dynamix […] We bought them sometime in the early to mid eighties….”

      Really? Are you sure of that? I would have thought you bought Dynamix around 1989 or 1990.

      Games like “David Wolf: Secret Agent” (http://www.mobygames.com/game/david-wolf-secret-agent)  or “Die Hard” (http://www.mobygames.com/game/die-hard)  didn’t have any link with Sierra whatsoever, did they?

      Vincent.

    • #29430 Reply
      Unknown,Unknown
      Participant

      Quote:
      “… (by Vincent Joguin)
      Games like “David Wolf: Secret Agent” (http://www.mobygames.com/game/david-wolf-secret-agent)  or “Die Hard” (http://www.mobygames.com/game/die-hard)  didn’t have any link with Sierra whatsoever, did they?

      Vincent.
      …”

      Vincent:

      You must be right on the timing, because both of the games you mentioned were done pre-acquisition.

      -Ken W

    • #29431 Reply
      Unknown,Unknown
      Participant

      The acquisitions began indeed in 1990. According to Jeff Tunnell:

      β€œI founded Dynamix in Eugene, Oregon in 1984, guided the company from an independent game developer for Electronic Arts to an affiliated label of Activision, then sold the company to Sierra On-Line, a publicly traded company (and now the entertainment division of Vivendi/Universal), in 1990.”

      http://www.armchairempire.com/Interviews/jeff-tunnell-garagegames.htm 

      It’s off-topic, but I wondered about another issue, the acquisition of Broderbund a year later? Was this indeed the case?

      See this article
      http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0NEW/is_1991_March_11/ai_10455931 

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