Game Arts

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    • #28104 Reply
      Unknown,Unknown
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      I have all working design games. I notice most are made by Game Arts in Japan. On my PQ3 disk jackets, I see Sierra’s logo, Game Arts’ logo and Dynamix’ logo.

      In 1993, Game Arts did a re-make of Silpheed for Sega CD. It was released by Sega, and had a hidden code for really dirty words to be said during the game. Still retained a GA rating by old VRC. I had Silpheed for my old Tandy 1800 DLX, and enemies and music are all the same, as well as plot.

      Now, I also have a few Dynamix games for Sega CD, like Willy Beamish and Rise of the Dragon. Why didn’t Game Arts just go through Dynamix for the release? I notice that Game Arts is going many published now, and is still making bad sequels to good games. They’ve done Lunar, which I think would’ve sold if were translated by Sierra for PC back in 1993. Of course, I’m not in the position of actually make a judgement like that, just a gamer.

      I’m surprised VU Games doesn’t claim ownership on Game Arts.

      Lastly about Silpheed for Sega CD . . . the polygon “rendering” in the game is full-motion video using the Cinepak codec during the game. Even the music is Cinepak’d, and sounds music more crappy than the audio tracks included for play on the disc itself. I’ve seen many video games magazines give credit for Silpheed for being the first “modern” polygon game for home consoles. This bothers me, because I know that the PC (Sierra) version of Silpheed is quiet impressive for both Apple II and PC back 16 years ago. The Sega CD version is pretty good as game, but it is not rendering the polygons at all. The first “modern” polygon game for consoles is Nintendo’s StarFox, which came out in March 1993, before the Sega CD was even released. Virtua Racing came out in 1994 at a whopping $99.99 price, which I picked one up a month later in the discount bin for $19.99. Fine by me on that.

      Silpheed and a few other Sierra “arcade” titles were really good. I liked Silpheed a lot, compared to the Nintendo games that were out. It’s surprising that not many PC games back then were like the Nintendo games of the era, but that was the biggest advantage to the PC. The games were as deluxe as a game could get, because of the huge price of PC/Mac/Apple II systems back then. Amazing how cheap PC games are feeling today. I don’t know when the companies decided that the PC is a gaming console in the vein of tradition Nintendo-type consoles.

      Any thought welcome on what we ought have in PC gaming today is very welcome.

      I’d like to see traditional adventure games, and really unique stuff like Red Baron-type sims (I find MS Flight Sim boring), and Battle Chess 4000 . . . just stuff that consoles could never do, and made the PC a place for extreme single-player fun.

    • #28105 Reply
      Unknown,Unknown
      Participant

      (re: Game Arts)

      Very cool info there Binky!

      I remember laughing at all my friends playing their crappy 8-bit nintendo system while I was living it up on my computer with Sierra games!!! All the while I secretly played nintendo 🙂

    • #28106 Reply
      Unknown,Unknown
      Participant

      (re: Game Arts)

      me too

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